Back

FLIP

FLIP: Florida Invasive Plants

Neyraudia reynaudiana

Common Name(s): Burmareed, silkreed

Origin

South Asia.

Ecological Impact

Now well established in the globally rare pine rockland habitats of Dade County and viewed as a threat to rare species there, especially since its high flammability promotes frequent fires, enhancing its spread (Schmitz et al. 1997). By 1993, established in nearly 75% of Dade County pine rocklands outside Everglades National Park, with high mortality of the native south Florida slash pine (Pinus elliottii var. densa) linked to fires involving this grass (Maguire 1993).

Description

Robust, reed-like perennial to 3 m (10 ft) tall, forming clumps from short, coarse rhizomes. Stems often branched and filled with soft pith. Leaf sheaths 10-25 cm (4-10 in) long, smooth, shining, clasping, woolly at the top with a line of collar hairs and ligule of hairs. Leaf blades linear, flat or involute, 20-100 cm (8-39 in) long and 8-25 mm (0.3-1 in) wide, glabrous below, sparsely short-hairy above, with margins smooth or rough and midvein inconspicuous; blades often deciduous from sheaths. Inflorescence a large, feathery, silver-hairy terminal panicle, 30-60 cm (12-24 in) long, densely and finely branched, nodding. Spikelets 6-8 mm (0.2-0.3 in) long, 4- to 8-flowered, with lemmas long-hairy and slender-awned (awns often curved).

Identification Tips

May be confused with the common reed, Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud., but its rhizomes are long, often forming leafy stolons; its leaf sheaths without a hairy collar; and its spikelets without awns.

History

Foliar herbicide application: 1%-3% Roundup®. Cut stem herbicide application: 10% Garlon 4. In areas with surrounding desirable vegetation, the culms can be cut to ground level and sprayed with 5% Roundup® when the plant reaches a height of approximately 12 to 18 inches (cut stems should be removed from the site). Removing seedheads before treatment will reduce need for follow-up. Responds quickly after fire and should be targeted as soon as new growth reaches 12 to 18 inches. Most native plants will not have resprouted from the fire by the time Burma reed has reached this height, and it can be easily treated with little concern about nontarget damage.

Range

Found in Collier, Miami-Dade, Monroe, and Palm Beach County.

Management Strategies

Foliar: 1%-3% Roundup®. Cut stem: 10% Garlon 4. In areas with surrounding desirable vegetation, the culms can be cut to ground level and sprayed with 5% Roundup® when the plant reaches a height of approximately 12 to 18 inches (cut stems should be removed from the site). Removing seedheads before treatment will reduce need for follow-up. Responds quickly after fire and should be targeted as soon as new growth reaches 12 to 18 inches. Most native plants will not have resprouted from the fire by the time Burma reed has reached this height, and it can be easily treated with little concern about nontarget damage.

Photos

Most photos courtesy of the Atlas of Florida Plants; click for additional plant details.

Share Share to Twitter Share to Facebook Share to Email
Florida Invasive Plants